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Here's a statement of the obvious: The opinions expressed here are those of the participants, not those of the Mutual Fund Observer. We cannot vouch for the accuracy or appropriateness of any of it, though we do encourage civility and good humor.

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Tesla’s Cybertruck is available for preorder with a $100 deposit

Comments

  • Nope, that thing is butt ugly
  • edited November 23
    I just wish Toyota would make a reasonable, normal, small or mid hybrid, and sell it in the U.S.
  • By reasonable do you mean less expensive? I'd like to see vehicles that would let a buyer pick and choose amongst all of the technological gee-gaws.
  • AndyJ said:

    I just wish Toyota would make a reasonable, normal, small or mid hybrid, and sell it in the U.S.

    They've been making one since 1997. It's called the Prius.

    Or do you mean a hybrid truck, in which case Toyota has been developing one for a while called the A-BAT.

  • edited November 23
    Tesla describes the heaviest duty truck of the three this way: “Triple motor all-wheel drive with 500 miles of range, 14,000-pound towing capacity, and 0–60 mph in under 2.9 seconds for $69,900 (though this version won’t start production until late 2022)”

    On one hand, a good heavy duty pickup is a real gas guzzler - at least when used for shorter hauls. A lot has to do with the specs which are customized to owner’s needs. A lower axle ratio adds power, towing capacity and to an extent maximum weight capacity fully loaded. But the same feature is often the reason two “identical” pickups will get substantially different mileage.

    An electric drive system would seem to solve the (gas) mileage issue. However, these trucks don’t look very heavy duty. I don’t know how much a full sized GM or properly spec’d Ford would tow, but I’ll guess a lot more than the advertised 14,000 pounds. Note that they don’t even state the maximum cargo weight it is designed to carry. Heavier chassis, springs, drive train contribute to that number but cut into mileage. And that box looks awfully short. I like the 8’ long box for hauling. Some guys get by with a 7 or 7.5 foot bed. This is likely only in the 5-6 foot area.

    Of course most new pickups don’t get used for heavy hauling or towing. I’m not sure what the appeal is to some buyers, but apparently some buy them for “show” or to make some kind of personal statement. And, yep, even a smaller lighter truck is useful for those things that won’t fit in the car trunk or SUV. To each his own.
  • For California residents only: If the PG&E is down your electric vehicle is about as useful as an anvil.
  • edited November 24
    Simon said:

    AndyJ said:

    I just wish Toyota would make a reasonable, normal, small or mid hybrid, and sell it in the U.S.

    They've been making one since 1997. It's called the Prius.

    Thanks for the smartass comment. Of course I meant a pickup - that's the subject of the article. (The A-bat? Really? Does that fit your definition of "reasonable" and "normal"?)
  • edited November 24
    AndyJ said:

    Simon said:

    AndyJ said:

    I just wish Toyota would make a reasonable, normal, small or mid hybrid, and sell it in the U.S.

    They've been making one since 1997. It's called the Prius.

    Thanks for the smartass comment. Of course I meant a pickup - that's the subject of the article. (The A-bat? Really? Does that fit your definition of "reasonable" and "normal"?)
    Prepare for the future grandpa. It's going to be insane. Your ancient views of 'reasonable' and 'normal' are already history.

    A suggestion: why don't you contact TOYOTA and not a mutual fund forum about a TOYOTA pickup?
  • Toyota already made a hybrid Highlander, an AWD SUV. Don't see many on the road. Even the hybrid Camry is not all the popular comparing to Prius. I think there is a fundamental limitation on the power to weight ratio from the electrical- gasoline engine; the diminishing point of return is much less favorable with heavier vehicles. Also the battery life of Prius is about 60,000 miles and it costs over $4,500 to replace. We owned an earlier generation Prisus and there are other costly maintenance we faced along the way. I digress... but the point is hybrid vehicles have their limitations but there are a whole lot better than all electric vehicles. There is just not enough infrastructure with enough recharging stations even in larger cities; perhaps 10 years from now. Not sure how electrical vehicles perform in colder climates. My electric gears powered by Li-ion batteries do not like freezing temperatures.
  • edited November 24
    @Sven - Good analysis. So much depends on what the user of the truck intends. Guys that plow snow all day long in the winter probably scoff at the idea of a battery operated pickup. Not so fast ... even back in WWII subs operated submerged on battery power.

    The lith-ion battery is pretty incredible. Bought a battery powered chainsaw last summer. Haven’t run the old gas powered Husquvarna since. Weight / power? Don’t know - but the electric is only about 75% the weight. Cheaper (standard) battery lasts close to half an hour on most jobs. Some more expensive available batteries for that saw last twice that long. With 2 of the less expensive batteries, I’ve got close to an hour’s working time - which is plenty.

    @Old_Joe - From your later comment. Sounds like a nice saw. My 16” Oregon uses a 36 volt battery. Likely you’re getting same output from the dual 18 volt batteries. Quite possibly longer run time.
  • @hank- Same here. Have had a 16" Makita electric chain saw for a number of years. Very good tool, but the cord is a nuisance. If you recall the Russian River had a major flood last year, and our backyard was a real disaster. Natural brush, tree limbs, and anything floatable and made of wood (fence sections, dock pieces, yard furniture, etc.) wound up in huge piles in the yard. With the ground totally saturated from the flood and junk (some with sharp edges) everywhere, didn't care for the idea of dragging an extension cord around through the mud.

    Bought a smaller 14" Makita with the high capacity batteries (two 18 volt batteries) to help with the cleanup. What a gem! That little guy is lightweight, easily portable, and really does one heck of a job. The batteries last quite a long time, even under hard use. I almost never use the corded one now.

  • This just in on my brokerage feed. Reuters is the source.

    "Nov 23 (Reuters) - Tesla Inc ( TSLA )
    "Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Saturday that there have been about 150,000 orders thus far for the electric carmaker's Cybertruck, which was unveiled on Friday.

    146k Cybertruck orders so far, with 42% choosing dual, 41% tri & 17% single motor", Musk said in a tweet http://bit.ly/2D7ob9Q, adding separately that the orders were achieved without any advertising or paid endorsements."
  • @hank, did a short stint working in an American research station in South Poles. Everything depends on batteries are pushed to the limits. Cold weather drains the batteries rapidlly. Often we kept battery packs inside inside our coats and change them several times a day.
  • Check out the new Toyota RAV4 hybrid. It gets 40 mpg in city driving, even with AWD. Price supposedly starts at $28,000 but all the ones I’ve seen at the dealership near me are loaded with options and more expensive. Presumably you could order a base model, which doesn’t cost much more than the gasoline version.

    Toyota styling in general turns me off, but the new RAV4 is not so bad.

    BTW, Toyota has increased the battery warranty for all of its hybrid vehicles to 10 years, 150,000 miles.
  • @Tarwheel - I have to agree with you on the styling. It's probably just me but I find myself thinking that the front end designers of nearly all vehicles are trying to out-ugly each other these days. Only the Camaro makes me look twice.
  • The Prius battery was indeed limited at 60000 miles in the past but the newer models are far better. I have one (2014) in New England with 90000 miles without any battery issues.

    Once it wouldnt start at zero but it is fine anywhere above that. It is but ugly and they dumb down the driver with the stupid keyless ignition and a bunch of hard to find options for the keyless ignition ( don't leave the key within any distance ( /20 feet even vertical) of the car for any length of time or it will drain the battery)

    Even at 60 mph I get 45 to 50 mpg. A lot of that is aerodynamics as the mpg dropped to 30 with a canoe on the top.

    Now I am retired I want a pickup. I think the electric or hybrid models will sell well for people who dont haul huge loads but shy away from 10 to 15 mpg.

    However, the "cybertruck" is pretty ugly. How would you put a camper on that thing?
  • edited November 26
    One of the biggest hazards in northern michigan is car / deer collision - worse problem in the darker hours. Has been known to total some vehicles. Now, if that truck is as tough as Musk claims, it should be able to slice right through a large buck, leaving only some easily hosed-off blood stains. That odd looking aero shape would seem ideal for directing said deer right over the top of the truck (possibly into the path of the vehicle behind you). With any kind of luck the carcass might even land in the bed of the truck. In Michigan you’re allowed to keep road kill. I see more meat on the table and likely lower insurance rates.
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