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Stocks Are Plunging -- Here's What You Need to Know

edited March 15 in Other Investing
https://www.fool.com/investing/2020/03/11/stocks-are-plunging-heres-what-you-need-to-know.aspx

/Stocks Are Plunging -- Here's What You Need to Know
We have an update on real estate and some promising REITs to put on your watchlist.

Matthew Frankel, CFP

The stock market is plunging, with the S&P 500 down by more than 18% from its all-time highs reached earlier this year. While this can certainly seem scary, Industry Focus: Financials host Jason Moser and Fool.com contributor Matt Frankel, CFP are here to help make sense of things./


Maybe selective look at your portfolio and consider starting positions or add to stocks etf mf that you really liked or have on watch list

Comments

  • or just leave alone and watch this instead:


  • The response to this pandemic requires real leadership. It's evident that POTUS has no credibility. He should step aside and allow seasoned health care professionals (Dr. Fauci et al.) to take the lead.
  • How is the DSENX doing?
  • last 11 days down ~12%, SP500 down ~10%, bond sauce aggravating things rather than the opposite
  • last 11 days down ~12%, SP500 down ~10%, bond sauce aggravating things rather than the opposite

    But oh, those monthly dividends just keep adding more shares.
  • edited March 15
    Thanks John -

    Certainly an extensive and informed conversation. I don’t doubt these guys’ knowledge of markets. But too many parts in motion right now to reach any firm conclusions. I wouldn’t invest in their recommendations - nor would I necessarily avoid them.

    I see a big R on the horizon. Stocks tend to lead coming out of one.
  • WABAC said:

    last 11 days down ~12%, SP500 down ~10%, bond sauce aggravating things rather than the opposite

    But oh, those monthly dividends just keep adding more shares.
    All my figs are from M* graph of $10k growth, so includes divs, not that it is computed daily ...
  • I would have thought it would have done better, forgot about the bond side of it. I also looked up TWEIX. Don’t own it but remember how everybody considered it because of it’s record in 2008. It is doing horribly as well. Looked up a few others, VEIPX hurting also. A whole new ballgame this time around.
  • WABAC said:

    last 11 days down ~12%, SP500 down ~10%, bond sauce aggravating things rather than the opposite

    But oh, those monthly dividends just keep adding more shares.
    All my figs are from M* graph of $10k growth, so includes divs, not that it is computed daily ...
    I understand.

    But one of the reasons I bought it was for the monthly dividends. Sort of like dollar cost averaging.
  • edited March 16
    YTD DSENX lags the S&P by a couple points. But 2.5 months is too short a period to compare. My benchmark TRRIX (40/60) is down about 9% and I’m off another 1 percent more than it is this year. Both are manageable losses considering last year.

    This is the point where it begins to get really dicey. Should one buy the big gapping declines of 4, 5 or 6% on a given day or abstain? Normally I’d say buy. But this global health issue throws us into unknown waters. Bloomberg quoted one analyst this morning as predicting that virtually every airline in the world will be facing bankruptcy by May. I find it hard to argue with that. Who wants to fly? The airlines’ woes are one reason oil is approaching its 2016 low of $26-$27.

    Plenty of questions. Few answers. I guess Dalio and many other heggies have sustained a real beating this year.
  • hank said:

    YTD Should one buy the big gapping declines of 4, 5 or 6% on a given day or abstain? Normally I’d say buy. But this global health issue throws us into unknown waters.

    I was thinking about buying today, until the Fed, and the Pres, intervened.

    Maybe tomorrow.

    At this point I'm hoping the TP knuckleheads are on the sidelines contemplating their hoards so normal people can get what they need.
  • I'm still planning to continue buying stocks. Dollar-cost-averaging and no commissions are your friend!
  • edited March 16
    I'm going to finally start a cash-position. All my "cash" is just the combined amount that my Fund Managers are sitting on. I can't believe things will turn around before the election in November. If things bounce-back quickly, I won't be sad. What about the prospect of a 1930s extended Depression? Oil is one good indicator. Bouncing around like a yo-yo. I paid for more expensive gas in California in October than I ever have in Hawaii. And generally, Hawaii's gas is 30% higher than I was accustomed to, back East. (Something about the "West coast rip-off" I have been told about, besides.) Now, oil has taken a tumble. ..... History teacher long ago told us that in the '30s, you could buy a whole meal at a not-so-fancy restaurant for a quarter. ..... But with the gummint greasing the economy, DEFLATION doesn't seem like any kind of realistic prospect. These massive debt numbers leave me numb. What is the dollar worth, anymore? Two cents? Portfolio is down from the recent high by -15%. That's digestible, though not pleasant, of course. I moved a big chunk to bonds last year, and that helps, but bonds are still sinking along with everything else, notwithstanding.... Gonna send a small amount to BIAWX.
  • edited March 17
    Hi guys, Old_Skeet is thinking of reducing my cash allocation area from 20% to 15% and raise my income area from 40% to 42% and my equity area from 40% to 43%. Seems muni's have taken a beating of late and I'll buy a little there plus continue to buy on the equity side mostly in my equity income sleeve. And, so it goes. Take care. Old_Skeet
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