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Can someone help with a stock market question?

edited March 15 in Other Investing
After reading a current article in The Economist, I'm thinking of investing a relatively small amount directly in a company called ASML. In the US it is carried on NASDAQ as ASML Holding N.V., with the trading symbol "ASML".

Info from Wickipedia: ASML Holding N.V. is a Dutch company and currently the largest supplier in the world of photolithography systems for the semiconductor industry. The company manufactures machines for the production of integrated circuits.

Over the years I've occasionally owned ADR (American Depositary Receipt) shares, but this is the first time that I've encountered what seems to me (likely incorrectly) to be an alternative listing on the OTC market. That OTC listing symbol is "ASMIY".

The share price for ASML is more than twice that of ASMIY, and the P/E ratio for ASML is roughly 44 vs 19 for ASMIY. The WSJ indicates that ASMIY is a competitor for ASML, and other information that I find does indicate that ASMIY is indeed in the same business. The problem is that I can't seem to easily find a side-by-side comparison between the two listings, and I have no idea if those two symbols are somehow representing two different companies, or (somehow) two different aspects of the same company.

Thanks for any help on this one!

Comments

  • To me this looks like ASMIY provides/manufactures the equipment used by ASML in it's photolithography systems. Double-check to be sure.

    From M* ASMIY - ASM International NV ADR

    Company Profile
    Based in the Netherlands, ASM International supplies semiconductor manufacturing equipment. ASM's front-end equipment, such as atomic layer deposition and epitaxial tools, is used in the preparation of silicon wafers and fabrication of semiconductor layers. ASM's 25%-owned subsidiary, ASM Pacific Technology, manufactures back-end tools used to assemble and package semiconductors into their final form.

    Contact
    Versterkerstraat 8, Almere, 1322 AP, Netherlands
    T +31 881008810
    [email protected]
    www.asm.com

    M* ASML - ASML Holding NV ADR

    Company Profile
    Founded in 1984 and based in the Netherlands, ASML is a leading manufacturer of photolithography systems used in the manufacturing of semiconductors. Photolithography is the process in which a light source is used to expose circuit patterns from a photomask onto a semiconductor wafer. ASML's products are used at every major semiconductor manufacturer, including Intel, Samsung, and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing.

    Contact
    De Run 6501, Veldhoven, 5504 DR, Netherlands
    T +31 402683000
    www.asml.com
  • Deposition and photolithography are two distinct steps in the manufacture of semiconductors. A third step is etching.

    One deposits a layer of silicon, then applies the mask (stencil) for a layer of circuitry, and then etches the layer. Rinse and repeat for each successive layer of circuitry.

    It looks like these two companies manufacture equipment for different steps in the process. I'm more familiar with the etch step and etcher providers like Lam Research than with these companies.

    Hitachi has a short page that reiterates what I wrote above, and clarifies front end manufacture vs. back end assembly.

    https://www.hitachi-hightech.com/global/products/device/semiconductor/process.html
  • Check out this link from ASML:

    https://www.asml.com/en/company/about-asml/history

    I have owned a position in ASML for several years.


  • As I posted I said to myself that this question should draw out the MFO big guns & heavy hitters, and I am certainly not disappointed in that prediction. Thanks to all of you guys.

    A footnote: If Ted were still with us I'm betting that he would have tried to help also. We may not have been great friends but the man was a consummate financial professional.
  • Geez, thanks I think. I'm not sure I'm even in the same league as msf and TheShadow, and I often wonder if I'm even playing the same game.
  • Tell me!
  • Well, with a buy limit order at $260, after tomorrow I'll likely also have a small position in ASML. That ought to be enough to cause the entire market to drop at least another 20%. :(
  • Old_Joe said:

    Well, with a buy limit order at $260, after tomorrow I'll likely also have a small position in ASML. That ought to be enough to cause the entire market to drop at least another 20%. :(

    I think about buying individual stocks.

    I was at a backyard barbque in Berkeley in early 2001 when an Apple employee said "Hey, check this out."

    I thought to myself:

    Oh. How nice. A hard drive with a headphone jack. I'm sure Sony Walkman is trembling in its boots.

    Sigh.
  • Mark said:

    Geez, thanks I think. I'm not sure I'm even in the same league as msf and TheShadow, and I often wonder if I'm even playing the same game.

    You're giving me way too much credit. Having worked a few years in the semiconductor industry (specifically working with fabs), I lucked out in terms of knowing something about the subject.

    Still, thanks for the compliment. You're no slouch yourself.

  • AAPL. Cripes, I recall when the stock was at $3.00/share in the 1990s. But I had no money to invest, then.
  • edited March 12
    When my son was in college in the early 2000s and majoring in econ and writing analytic papers on tech companies, he mentioned that he thought Apple looked good and really promising, still bright future, etc. I said Aw, man, look at its recent runup, it's already in the 90s, get serious....
  • Yeah.. I wonderd if I should take a chance at 24. Oh well...
  • I don't know what he owns or invests in, or necessarily want to, probably indexes, although I worry about both kids, even more about their age cohort, and above all about my grandkids and their future. Etc etc etc.
    (Otoh he just took a job w McKinsey, so there's that.)
  • edited March 13
    Re ASML:
    So the limit order bought me 25 @ $246. Causing the market to immediately drop it to 240ish. What the hell... 25 more @ 240. We shall see.
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